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Formerly one of the six federal units constituting the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Bosnia and Herzegovina gained its independence during the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s. Bosnia and Herzegovina can be described as a federal democratic republic that is transforming its economy into a market-oriented system, and it is a potential candidate for membership in the European Union. The country is home to three ethnic “constituent peoples”: Bosniaks, Serbs and Croats. Regardless of ethnicity, a citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina is often identified in English as a Bosnian.

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bosnia and Herzegovina

The most notorious of Bosnia and Herzegovina is its mountainous landscape and extravagant, best seen from its national parks. For some, the country is synonymous with the Yugoslav wars that devastated the Balkans in 1990, there are still remnants of it and today has a fractured infrastructure and parts of the mine-infested country.

However, there are many positive aspects for which is worth visiting the urban centers of Bosnia and Herzegovina, especially the cosmopolitan capital of Sarajevo with his Turkish heritage and atmosphere of cafes. Everywhere there are historic forts, ancient mosques and monasteries and Catholic churches. But perhaps above all this is the rebuilt Ottoman bridge in Mostar, which symbolises the past and a positive new beginning for the country. Continue reading “Bosnia and Herzegovina: A Country Reborn” »

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Bolivia Is a landlocked nation of ten million people in South America, southwest of Brazil and bordering Argentina and Paraguay in the south, and Chile and Peru in the west. Bolivia is a treasure trove of ancient knowledge if you’ve ever been fascinated with myth, legends, and the mysteries of native South American cultural treasures. The highest natural lake in the world, Lake Titicaca, is here. And the capitol city of La Paz, Bolivia is the capitol of the highest altitude in the world. With a picturesque skyline dominated by the Illimani, a forbidding peak soaring impossibly into the sapphire azimuth, La Paz’s ruins and the ancient foundations of the church of St. Augustine are testament to the history that still stands here in Bolivia, whose timeless forts and temples have an eerily calming effect upon the visitor.

noel kempff national park

noel kempff national park

It was only recently that an earthquake caused part of the monastery of St. Augustine’s foundation to expose ancient stones of the Coricancha north in the old Inca capitol of Cuzco, which is in modern day Peru. This place is the dwelling place of the sun, and the home of the infamous sun disc, easily one of the most sacred and revered sites of the ancient Incan Empire. La Paz, Bolivia, is situated 12,000 feet above sea level, on a canyon floor, in the winter is often bathed in a clear, intense sunlight. Continue reading “Bolivia – a treasure trove of ancient knowledge” »

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Steeped in myth and legend, castles have always been popular destinations for lovers of history and architecture. Anyone who has ever visited a castle cannot deny the ambiance and magic of these impressive relics of a time long-forgotten.

Windsor Castle
Windsor Castle is the most famous of all castles in England. Still a principal home of the British royal family, the sprawling structure is the largest and oldest residential castle in the world. The most bloody episode in the history of Windsor Castle took place during the English Civil War, when Oliver Cromwell‚Aos Roundhead troops seized the castle and used it as a fortress and the headquarters of the parliamentary New Model Army. The deposed monarch, Charles I, was briefly imprisoned at Windsor Castle and was buried here after his beheading in 1648.

Windsor Castle

Windsor Castle

Windsor remains a primary residence of the royal family, but much of it is now open to the public. Sights on a Windsor Castle tour include the daily changing of the guard, a more elaborate and exciting affair here than at Buckingham Palace. The public rooms contain a wealth of painting, decorative ceiling designs, and antique furniture. A fire in 1992 destroyed parts of the royal apartments, open to a Windsor Castle tour when the Queen is not in residence, but these have been painstakingly restored. A Windsor Castle tour should include a walk through the Windsor Great Park, a beautifully sculpted garden in the remains of a royal hunting forest. Continue reading “Famous England Castles” »

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England is the largest country in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and borders Wales to the West and Scotland to the North. The English Channel and the North Sea separates England from Europe and the Irish Sea separates England from Ireland.

Starting with the Roman invasion in the 1st century, England has a long and rich history that includes a long line of kings and queens and numerous battles. Tourists to England will enjoy the wealth of historic places to visit that include The Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Stonehenge, Hadrian’s Wall, and many prehistoric sights. Numerous cities of interest include London – the capital of England, steeped in history and offering an abundance of things to do; Bath, a World Heritage city – featuring the ancient Roman Baths and Royal Crescent; Oxford – famed for its university and the Bridge of Sighs; Cambridge – featuring many attractions and a world-famous university; Salisbury – with the breathtaking Salisbury Cathedral, Old Sarum Castle and Old Wardour Castle.

Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge

There are several interesting tourist spots in England, and the following are among the most well known. If you’re going to visit the country, you might want to check these out.
Continue reading “Enjoy on England Tourism” »

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Bhutan is a landlocked country, closed off from the Nirvanic Ocean by Indian federal states Shangri-La and Xanadu. The name “Bhutan” comes from the gas with the same name, emitted in abundant amounts from the frequent cow dung heaps that besides unclimable mountains constitute Bhutans major landscape forms.

It is nicknamed the “butt” of the world. Those 29000 foot high mountains are like one giant ass hanging out in space ready to fart gas into the atmosphere and keep the ozone layer from depleting. It is a little known fact that gigantic missle silos are hidden beneath the mountains, waiting to annihilate all those whom dishonor Bhutan.

Bhutan

Bhutan

Most industrial areas are also located in southern region. The fertile central valleys (3,600 – 8,500 ft) are covered by verdant coniferous and deciduous forests and dotted with numerous monasteries, temples and dzongs. Western Bhutan’s major valleys of Ha, Paro, Thimphu, Punakha / Wangduephodrang are intensely cultivated. The people in these valleys are well-to-do and they build large homes of rammed earth in which several generations often live together. The formidable Black Mountains, rising to over 16,000 ft forms a natural boundary between Western Bhutan and Central Bhutan. Central Bhutan is made up of several districts where different dialects are spoken. Khyeng, in the south, is covered by semi-tropical jungle and is famous for its bamboo and ratten ware. Further north is Trongsa, home of one of Bhutan’s most impressive dzongs. Bumthang’s four valleys, between 8,530 – 13,000 ft with their picturesque countryside, beautiful coniferous forests and numerous Religious sites are often known as the “Heart of Bhutan”. Eastern Bhutan, home of the Sharchops (“people of the east”), is generally warmer. The eastern women are renowned for their weaving skills and produce fine textiles of silk and cotton. Northern Bhutan, lying largely above 11,500 ft is region of glacial valleys, alpine meadows and is home to the semi-nomadic yak-herders of Lingshi, Laya and Lunana, have almost no contact with Western civilisation and trade only in bartered goods. Towering above this magnificent trekking country are the eternal snow-clad peaks of the majestic Jhomolhari, Jichu Drake and Gangkar Puensum, rising to over 23,000 ft. Continue reading “Welcome to the Land of Thunder Dragon – free ads for Bhutan” »

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